LONG READS

We Do This ‘Til We Free Us: Abolitionist Organizing and Transforming Justice by Mariame Kaba (Haymarket Books)

What if social transformation and liberation isn’t about waiting for someone else to come along and save us? What if ordinary people have the power to collectively free ourselves? In this timely collection of essays and interviews, Mariame Kaba reflects on the deep work of abolition and transformative political struggle.

With a foreword by Naomi Murakawa and chapters on seeking justice beyond the punishment system, transforming how we deal with harm and accountability, and finding hope in collective struggle for abolition, Kaba’s work is deeply rooted in the relentless belief that we can fundamentally change the world. As Kaba writes, “Nothing that we do that is worthwhile is done alone.”

My Grandmother’s Hands: Racialized Trauma and the Pathway to Mending Our Hearts and Bodies

https://www.marcusbooks.com/book/9781942094470

In this groundbreaking book, therapist Resmaa Menakem examines the damage caused by racism in America from the perspective of trauma and body-centered psychology.

The body is where our instincts reside and where we fight, flee, or freeze, and it endures the trauma inflicted by the ills that plague society. Menakem argues this destruction will continue until Americans learn to heal the generational anguish of white supremacy, which is deeply embedded in all our bodies. Our collective agony doesn’t just affect African Americans. White Americans suffer their own secondary trauma as well. So do blue Americans—our police.

My Grandmother’s Hands is a call to action for all of us to recognize that racism is not only about the head, but about the body, and introduces an alternative view of what we can do to grow beyond our entrenched racialized divide.

  • Paves the way for a new, body-centered understanding of white supremacy—how it is literally in our blood and our nervous system.
  • Offers a step-by-step healing process based on the latest neuroscience and somatic healing methods, in addition to incisive social commentary.

Radical Dharma

“Igniting a long-overdue dialogue about how the legacy of racial injustice and white supremacy plays out in society at large and Buddhist communities in particular, this urgent call to action outlines a new dharma that takes into account the ways that racism and privilege prevent our collective awakening.”

Love and Rage: The Path of Liberation through Anger

“In a time when the politics of anger—who gets to be angry, how, when and at whom—infuse every institutional and cultural sphere, Lama Rod Owens offers a radical re-envisioning of a deeply timely topic in his new book, Love and Rage The Path of Liberation Through Anger. Love and Rage will resonate with anyone who wants to metabolize or harness their anger for transformation and change.”  You can also listen to Lama Rod here.

America’s Enduring Caste System by Isabel Wilkerson in The New York Times. 

Want to learn more about reparations? Check out the long-form, interactive What is Owed article by Nikole Hannah-Jones, of the 1619 Project at The New York Times.

Want to learn more about restorative justice and non-violence? Check out Healing Resistance by Kazu Haga.

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